Pastor’s Notes – September 10, 2017

Father Shea

By Fr. James E. Shea, C.Ss.R.

Dear Parishioners and Friends:

An elderly Florida finished her grocery shopping. With her arms filled with groceries she returned to her car. There she found four young mend about ready to drive off…in her car. She dropped her shopping bags, screamed at the top of her voice. Then she grabbed a handgun from her purse and shouted, “I have a gun and I know how to use it! Get out of my car, you scumbags!” The men didn’t hesitate one bit. They bolted out of the car and ran like crazy. The lady, a bit shaken, proceeded to load her groceries into the back seat of the car. She got in, ready to drive away. She tried and tried. No luck! She glanced over at the items in the front seat and noticed that they were not hers. She checked the glove compart. Nothing in there was hers. She finally realized that she was in the wrong car.

She found her car five spaces down the line. She put her groceries in her car and drove immediately to the police station. She told the sergeant what had happened. He began laughing as he pointed to four frightened young men at the end of the counter. These lads were reporting a carjacking by a crazed elderly woman, brandishing a hand gun. ‘Happy Grandparent day.’

Monday is ‘Patriot Day.’ It is the day that the United States, and the world, remembers the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Washington. The day is commonly referred to as 9-11 (Nine Eleven). It is believed that 2,977 people died in the 4 attacks. President George W. Bush proclaimed September 11th Patriot Day in 2002.

On September 11th, United States flags should be flown at half-mast – both on U.S. soil and abroad. A moment of silence is held at 8:46 a.m. (EST) across the nation – commemorating the time the first plane struck the North tower of the World Trade Center. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum takes up over half of the destroyed World Trade Center site. It contains bronze parapets inscribed with the names of those killed on September 11, 2001, and those killed in the 1993 World Trade Center attack.

There is an old legend about St. Francis visiting the Sultan of Egypt. The Sultan tried to ensnare the saint in an uncompromising situation. The Sultan directed his staff to lay a carpet on the floor leading up to his throne. Crosses were weaved into the carpet. The Sultan said: “If he walks on those crosses I shall accuse him of insulting me.” As Francis approached the throne he walked on the crosses that had been weaved into the carpet. Immediately the Sultan charged him of insulting his God. But Francis answered: “Our Lord died between two thieves. The thieves also hung on crosses. We Christians have the true Cross; but the crosses of the thieves we leave to you. Without shame I walked on the crosses of thieves.”

We will be celebrating the feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross on Thursday. The feast day is also called ‘Triumph of the Cross.’ The cross is a symbol of our Christian faith. The cross becomes significant in our lives only because the Son of God, Jesus Christ, was crucified on the cross.

Early in the fourth century, St. Helena, another of the Roman Emperor Constatine, went to Jerusalem in search of the holy places of Christ’s life. Tradition had it that the temple of Aphrodite was built over the tomb of Jesus Christ. She ordered the temple he razed. Then, her son built the Basilica of the Holy Sepulchre over it. During the excavation, workers found three crosses. Legend has it that the one on which Jesus was identified when a dying woman touched it and was healed. From that time on the cross became an object of veneration.

We will be celebrating the feast of Our Lady of Sorrows on Friday. The Feast of Our Lady of Sorrows was formerly known as the Seven Sorrows of Mary. In 1668 the Servite Friars began a devotion to the suffering Virgin Mary. In 1814, Pius VII extended the devotion to the whole Western Church.

The Seven Sorrows (or Dolors)  are events in the life of the Blessed Virgin Mary which are a popular devotion and are frequently depicted in art. Mary’s sorrows are:

  1. The Prophecy of Simeon. (Luke 2:34-35) or the Circumcision of Christ
  2. The Flight into Egypt. (Matthew 2:13)
  3. The loss of the child Jesus in the Temple. (Luke 2:43-45)
  4. Mary’s meeting of Jesus on the way to Calvary.
  5. Jesus dying on the cross. (John 19:25)
  6. The piercing of the side of Jesus, and Mary’s receiving the body of Jesus in her arms. (Matthew 27:57-59)
  7. Placing of the body of Jesus in the tomb. (John 19:40-42).

The Seraphic Sisters of Our Lady of Sorrows staff the Chapel of Divine Mercy on Beethoven as well as St. Francis Nursing Home on Woodlawn. We Redemptorists celebrate daily Mass at the chapel and frequently celebrate Mass at the nursing home. Happy feast day Sisters!

You can’t turn the clock back but you can wind it up again.

Fr. Jim Shea, C.Ss.R.